OLJ 13 – Module 5 – Social media policy links

Creating a social media policy for your organisation can seem like a daunting task especially when the online landscape of social media tools is changing every day. An obvious place to begin is with the existing documentation specific to this topic from within your organisation and the industry.

For public libraries in Australia, the following resources will assist in this task. These resources have been listed on Delicious at #SISsocialmedia

Department of Justice Social Media Policy

This is the official social media policy for employees of the Department of Justice Victoria. Citing the document Guidance for use of social media in the Victorian public sector, it defines social media, advises how to use social media professionally and personally, lists some rules of engagement, and lists some legal issues such as privacy, security, copyright, harassment, the Creative Commons and more.

Guidance for use of social media in the Victorian public sector

This document provides guidance for the governing bodies and employees of those in the Victorian public sector. It refers to the Code of Conduct for Victorian Public Sector Employees citing this as the governing advice for employee behaviour including that within the context of using social media. Definitions are provided for: social media; responsibilities; and official use and private use.

Social Media Policy National Library of Australia

This is the official social media policy for the National Library of Australia. It provides context, objectives, scope, and compliance advice for their organisation and employees.  It defines controls for official use, professional use, private use, and inappropriate use. Risks and breaches are also explained.  A statement about the record keeping requirements is included.

NSW Public Libraries Learning 2.0 Activities: Social media policies – do you have one?

This is an excellent starting point for anyone wanting to create a social media policy for public libraries in Australia. It provides relevant legislative and policy framework, policy, principles underpinning the use of social networking technology, procedures for publishing, records managements, privacy, communications processes for organisations, the approval process, a checklist of considerations, and a disclaimer example.

Social Media Governance: Empowerment with Accountability by Chris Boudreaux

This website offers a Policy Database which lists organisations worldwide with links to their social media policies. Links take you to the policies and guidelines for international companies such as: Adidas, BBC, Flickr, IBM, the International Olympic Committee, Microsoft, New Zealand government, Reuters, Telstra, UK Government, US Air force, Universities, Yahoo!, and a lot more.

HL Wiki International: Social media policies

This Canadian website is a knowledge base for Health Librarians. There is information about how to evaluate social media policies as well as links to social media policies worldwide.  Recent articles are also listed with key points from those articles provided. Links to best practices are listed and references to further relevant information resources.

References

Department of Justice (2012). Department of Justice Social Media Policy. Retrieved from http://www.justice.vic.gov.au/home/about+us/our+values+and+behaviours/social+media+policy/

State Government of Victoria (2010). Guidance for use of social media in the Victorian public sector.  eGovernment Resource Centre. Retrieved from http://www.egov.vic.gov.au/victorian-government-resources/website-practice-victoria/web-2-0-victoria/guidance-for-use-of-social-media-in-the-victorian-public-sector-in-pdf-format-76kb.html

National Library of Australia. (2012). Social Media Policy. Retrieved from http://www.nla.gov.au/policy-and-planning/social-media

State Library of New South Wales (2008). Social media policies – do you have one? NSW Public Libraries Learning 2.0 Activities. Retrieved from http://nswpubliclibrarieslearning21.blogspot.com.au/2008/08/social-media-policies-do-you-have-one.html

Boudreaux, C. (2009). Policy database. Social Media Governance: Empowerment with Accountability by Chris Boudreaux. Retrieved from http://socialmediagovernance.com/policies.php

HLWIKI International (2013). Social media policies. HLWIKI Canada. Retrieved from http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php?title=Social_media_policies&oldid=120750

OLJ 11 – Module 5 – Social media policy and online behaviour

xplanevisualthinking (2009). Did you know 4.0. . Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ILQrUrEWe8

This video from 2009 shows some of the technology trends and ensuing behaviours relating to the use of online tools and media. It shows that people are seeking their media and news from sources that differ from the traditional news-media organisations. People are choosing the read online rather than in the traditional print news media. TV also has felt the effects of this change as more people choose their TV shows, movies, and alternative sources online. Therefore advertising has declined in the traditional media also, while online media has seen advertising skyrocket. Back in 2009 mobile phone use was growing and this trend has continued with more and more people owning and using their mobile phones for things they once did using their PC.

“The computer in your cell phone is a million times cheaper and a thousand times more powerful and about a hundred thousand times smaller [than the one computer at MIT in 1965]…” (xplanevisualthinking, 2009)

This change in media consumption has created some behaviours that need addressing and organisations approach this by creating policies to guide and protect their employees in this environment. This list is by no means comprehensive but here are some behaviours that organisational policy seeks to keep in check and in line with the organisations functions and responsibilities:

Behaviour Policy to address
Security concerns Firewalls; designated administrators; password change schedules
Illegal downloads Firewalls; acceptable use of internet at work statements; staff code of conduct; social media policy;
Access to media Firewalls; approval process for software applications; acceptable use of internet at work statements; social media policy;
Rise in texting Staff code of conduct; social media policy; approval process for software applications;
Incorrect use of Social Networking Social media policy; social media procedures; staff code of conduct; acceptable use of internet at work statements; designated administrators; password change schedules; approval process for software applications;

The use of online media has become so much a part of our everyday lives that organisations are struggling to keep up. Organisations can look to the industry standards to get some guidance. For libraries the Australian Library & Information Association offers advice about how to be safe online as well how to be Cybersmart. The National Library of Australia has published their Social Media Policy online and differentiates the use of social media within the organisation: official use; professional use; private use; and inappropriate use. The Australian Communications and Media Authority is the official organisation that represents Australia’s communications, and offers guidance about spam, digital literacy, online abuse, personal rights and safeguards, and a lot more.

In this article from Government News in 2010 a Municipal Association of Victoria representative stated, “that a social media policy was required to help councillors and council staff develop best practice and engage with communities that were already using a diverse range of social media outlets to communicate.” In trying to get government organisations on board, the Department of Justice Victoria released this video in 2011.

A range of guidelines, policies and documents relating to social media for government is now available on the eGovernment Resource Centre website.

References:

Australian Communications and Media Authority (n.d.). ACMA Home page. Retrieved from http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/HOMEPAGE/PC=HOME

Australian Library and Information Association (n.d.) ALIA guide to online content regulation. Retrieved from http://membership.alia.org.au/scripts/cgiip.exe/WService=ALIA/ccms.r?pageid=10577

Department of Justice Victoria (2011). Social Media Policy. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iQLkt5CG8I

eGovernment Resource Centre (2013). Social media policies and standards. Retrieved from http://www.egov.vic.gov.au/policies-and-standards/web-services-policies-and-standards/social-media-policies-and-standards.html

National Library of Australia (n.d.). Social media policy. Retrieved from http://www.nla.gov.au/policy-and-planning/social-media

O’Brien, R. (2010). MAV developing social media policy. Government News. Retrieved from http://www.governmentnews.com.au////article/MAV-developing-social-media-policy/IKQUGUSSQL.html

xplanevisualthinking (2009). Did you know 4.0. . Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ILQrUrEWe8